Pest service

Environmental Pest Service Hires New Director of Marketing – PCT


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Exclusion provides permanent work, the opportunity to help reduce health and safety risks, and a better reputation for the pest control company providing full work.

Matt Frye, PhD, and Jody Gangloff-Kaufmann, PhD, of the New York State IPM program at Cornell University, are part of the Scientific Coalition on Pest Exclusion (or SCOPE). SCOPE provides pest management professionals with the tools and practical references necessary to perform pest exclusion. Pest control professionals learn to recognize common entry points, use effective techniques, and implement those methods.

As part of their presentation at NPMA PestWorld 2017, Frye and Gangloff-Kaufmann shared with PMPs the benefits and opportunities of exclusionary programs.

ADVANTAGES. While SCOPE assesses and justifies the exact number, costs, and time elapsed before exclusion work, the cost benefits for pest management companies that adopt the exclusion include greater customer satisfaction and recalls. reduced, explains Gangloff-Kaufmann. Exclusion provides permanent work, the opportunity to help reduce health and safety risks, and a better reputation for the pest control company providing full work.

In order for a pest control company to successfully adopt an exclusion program, the company must “recognize the value of exclusion” and try “to hire people from the construction industry, do-it-yourselfers or contractors. wildlife control experts, ”says Gangloff-Kaufmann. In order to properly assess and sell exclusion work, pest control professionals need to explain risk reduction and overall building improvements. Evaluate and sell the exclusion for what it’s worth, and insist on the sustainability of the process, she says.

OPPORTUNITIES. For pest management companies in particular, pest exclusion may be offered as a routine service. Pest control companies may offer annual inspections twice a year: in the spring to assess winter damage and in the fall to prevent entry, describes Gangloff-Kaufmann. The opportunity will always exist to identify new entry points and to repair and replace materials. After the pest control professional does the exclusion work, they will need to follow up to assess the success of the job, she says.

For the pest management industry as a whole, there are opportunities to merge pest exclusion with larger programs, such as fire safety. “Preventing the fire from moving inside the building will also help prevent pests from moving,” says Gangloff-Kaufmann. The exclusion of pests can also be linked to weatherization because, for example, sealing windows and doors achieves both objectives.

A final question from SCOPE’s survey revealed that when asked the question “Overall, is pest exclusion a valuable part of your job in pest management?” »85% of the people questioned answered« yes ». Even though only 20 percent of technicians carry sealant, the positive response provides a “good, optimistic look at the industry” suggesting that exclusion is important, notes Gangloff-Kaufmann. She concludes: “I hope people will learn more about [exclusion] and start development.

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